Gaat ASML failliet dankzij POET Technologies...??

33 Posts, Pagina: 1 2 » | Laatste
DeZwarteRidder
0
May 2, 2014
POET Update
Dear Military Technology Reader, I was in Toronto on Monday, for a talk by Prof. Geoff Taylor of the University of Connecticut, before the prestigious Empire Club of Canada. Since the late 1970s and early 1980s -- beginning with his days at iconic old Bell Labs -- Dr. Taylor has developed a novel form of computer processing tech, called "Planar Opto-Electronic Technology" (POET); he's also the founder of POET Technologies (PTK: TSX-V), a great company that quadrupled in value since we bought in last year.
There's great news to report. Read on... The POET Story
It's been quite a year for POET, so far. Here's the share price chart, going back to December. POET shares hovered in the 60-cents range last year. In January, shares began to surge upwards. For the most part, POET skipped the tech "mini-crash" of March, and remained strong into April.
Many MTA readers saw great gains in a relatively short time frame. Trees don't grow to the sky, however, as old Wall Street gurus say.
In the past couple of weeks, we've seen more share price volatility, upwards as well as downwards. Part of it is that the company is gaining visibility; thus the share price has moved to where short-sellers are adding their brand of risk to the equation.
Global Coming Out Event Dr. Taylor's Empire Club speech, this week, was sponsored by Canada's National Post newspaper. Thus, the speech was something of a global "coming out" party for POET. Indeed, the Empire Club was packed with several hundred guests, including players from the tech investing side of trading desks in Toronto, New York, Boston and elsewhere. I also ran into large sections of the physics and electrical engineering faculty of numerous universities in and around Toronto.
I'll add another positive sign for POET. At least one rep from Canada's passport control, at Toronto's Lester Pearson International Airport, recognized POET. As I entered the country, she asked what was my business;
I told her that I was attending a talk at the Empire Club. "Oh yes," she said; "That must be important. We've had other people coming up to attend that talk." Hey, when the passport checker knows about a company?
It's a good sign. Other major media also covered Dr. Taylor's talk, as well. I saw people from an array of big-name news and wire services.
Thus, sooner or later, I expect to see articles about POET in a wide array of outlets -- after science writers wrap their collective brains around what's happening. Along these lines, so far, POET is an under-covered technology idea. It's no easy feat to explain the science, in that it involves all manner of crystallography and solid state physics -- "quantum effect" issues, and proton spins and such. It's fair to say that, up to now, POET has been buried within the shadows of university-level research and development. Then again, POET -- the company -- has a research arrangement with defense giant BAE Systems, too, so the word is getting out. (Plus other defense-oriented entities, but I'm not at liberty to publish those details.) Where's the Progress? POET... Looking ahead, I expect to see POET make some sort of licensing deal with a major tech player for civilian apps. For example, you can take a POET-type chip, wire it into your iPhone or iPad, and run the device with virtually no noticeable difference (to your finger tips and eyeballs), compared to how things work now. Except that the POET chip is much smaller, and uses far less power than what's currently in the Apple product. In other words, POET offers designers the ability to achieve and improve on processing goals. You can do things certainly as fast -- or much faster -- than with older tech; but you can do these things with a smaller chip, which is far more robust (the term is "monolithic"), and uses far less power. Indeed, the tech world -- and tech investors everywhere -- absolutely need to see the "next big thing" in terms of smaller-faster-better, and not a moment too soon.
Current research on silicon is not yielding improvements that designers need to achieve increased speed, smaller size, lower power consumption, less heat, etc. Something HAS to happen.
Here's where POET, and its unique gallium arsenide basis, comes into play. POET is new and different, but it's not THAT different. Yes, it's different atomic chemistry, but all based on well-understood engineering techniques in the fabrication-departments of the world. Thus POET won't scare people away because they think that they have to scrap all manner of past investment. Think of it in this way. The idea would be for a current chip user -- Apple, Samsung, Panasonic, etc. -- to go to a fabrication company -- Intel, AMD, Taiwan Semiconductor, etc. -- and apply POET tech to an existing foundry operation, say with a standard, existing eight-inch chip line. It's all doable.
Of course, nothing is that easy in this world. POET tech is based on gallium arsenide, versus traditional silicon. So right away, people have to think in terms of different materials. Then the tech is built on optical processing, using nano-lasers. That's different as well, to be sure. And make no mistake -- there are strong military apps with all of this; and the company has held many talks and demonstrations for reps from innumerable layers of the defense biz. Also, looking ahead, you'll doubtless see POET tech in coming generations of commercial products as well. POET has a bright future. That's all for now. Have a good weekend.

agorafinancial.com/portfolio/mta/
DeZwarteRidder
0
Ik zal het even samenvatten: POET beweert een nieuw chipsontwerp te hebben, dat goedkoper is te maken, zuiniger is en kleiner is.
Deze chips zouden gemaakt moeten kunnen worden op oude 100nm machines en zijn bedoeld om 'gewone' chips te vervangen.

Als dit klopt dan zou ASML in een klap geen marktleider meer zijn en zouden de nieuwe, dure UV-machines volkomen overbodig zijn.
Chiddix
0
MaranV
0
quote:

DeZwarteRidder schreef op 6 mei 2014 07:53:


[u]For example, you can take a POET-type chip, wire it into your iPhone or iPad, and run the device with virtually no noticeable difference


Is dit al bewezen? Ik moet eerlijk toegeven dat ik nog nooit een i-product open heb geschroefd, maar ik durf wel met zekerheid te zeggen dat daar gewoon een apple moederbordje in zit met een eigen soort aansluiting (socket) voor de CPU. Tenminste ik denk dat de POET chip een Central Processing Unit is aangezien ze het constant over processing hebben.

Tenzij die POET chip geen eigen soort socket heeft (wat ook nieuws zou zijn op CPU gebied, tenminste op PC/notebook gebied) kan het nog wel eens een tijdje gaan duren voordat Apple & dergelijke hun moederborden anders gaan laten produceren.
DeZwarteRidder
0
quote:

Your capital is at risk schreef op 6 mei 2014 14:28:


vraag is net beantwoord!



En wat is het antwoord...??
Cash Is King!
0
Dat ze de concurrenten zoals Poet continue in de gaten houden, maar dat deze producenten kwa kost-efficiency ver achterliggen. Deze bedrijven 'laseren' chips op een andere manier. En het is voor deze bedrijven onmogelijk om machines te maken die miljoenen chips kunnen produceren tegen een lage kostprijs, wat ASML wel doet.

Hij gaf verder eigenlijk aan totaal niet bezorgd te zijn voor deze bedrijven.
DeZwarteRidder
0
quote:

Your capital is at risk schreef op 6 mei 2014 14:47:


Dat ze de concurrenten zoals Poet continue in de gaten houden, maar dat deze producenten kwa kost-efficiency ver achterliggen. Deze bedrijven 'laseren' chips op een andere manier. En het is voor deze bedrijven onmogelijk om machines te maken die miljoenen chips kunnen produceren tegen een lage kostprijs, wat ASML wel doet.

Hij gaf verder eigenlijk aan totaal niet bezorgd te zijn voor deze bedrijven.



Ik vraag mij af of deze CEO ooit gehoord heeft van POET of is de vraag verkeerd gesteld...???
[verwijderd]
0
quote:

DeZwarteRidder schreef op 6 mei 2014 15:03:


Ik vraag mij af of deze CEO ooit gehoord heeft van POET of is de vraag verkeerd gesteld...???

stirlitz1.bnr.tc2.triple-it.nl/downl/... 0:54:46
Remfin
0
Vondt het verhaal van Wennink bij BNR persoonlijk geen reden voor de huidige koersdaling.....
[verwijderd]
0
Ja het is mogelijk dat ASML gaat echter naar de klote als andere nieuwe technologie verder ontwikkelt, b.v. ook mapper.
DeZwarteRidder
0
quote:

TAisOnzin schreef op 16 mei 2014 16:17:


Ja het is mogelijk dat ASML gaat echter naar de klote als andere nieuwe technologie verder ontwikkelt, b.v. ook mapper.



Mapper is ook al zo'n oud verhaal waar we weinig meer van horen.
[verwijderd]
0
quote:

Your capital is at risk schreef op 6 mei 2014 14:47:


Dat ze de concurrenten zoals Poet continue in de gaten houden, maar dat deze producenten kwa kost-efficiency ver achterliggen. Deze bedrijven 'laseren' chips op een andere manier. En het is voor deze bedrijven onmogelijk om machines te maken die miljoenen chips kunnen produceren tegen een lage kostprijs, wat ASML wel doet.

Hij gaf verder eigenlijk aan totaal niet bezorgd te zijn voor deze bedrijven.


Die vraag moet destijds verkeerd gesteld of begrepen zijn, want het POET technologisch platform voorziet in productie op bestaande productielijnen, ZIJ HET dan wel met wafers van Gallium-Arsenide (GaAs) en Indium-Gallium-Arsenide (inGaAs).

POET is dus geen bedreiging voor ASML als directe concurrent, maar wel voor het nieuwe EUV proces met de bijbehorende nieuwe machines.

Hoe dan ook, de recente overstap van ex-GlobalFoundries CEO Ajit Manocha (die ook nog voor NXP gewerkt heeft) naar POET Technologies is een stevige validatie van het POET platform.
DeZwarteRidder
0
quote:

doewap schreef op 11 juli 2014 16:20:

[...]

Hoe dan ook, de recente overstap van ex-GlobalFoundries CEO Ajit Manocha (die ook nog voor NXP gewerkt heeft) naar POET Technologies is een stevige validatie van het POET platform.


Het inhuren van deze zeer dure bobo zie ik vooral als een wanhoopsdaad of anders gezegd als een vlag op een modderschuit.
[verwijderd]
0
Je doet alsof die bobo daar niks over te zeggen heeft.

Ik denk daarentegen dat POET er niet zoveel over te zeggen had, zelfs al hadden ze bezwaar gehad, wat ook niet waarschijnlijk is.

Het staatsinvesteringsfonds van Abu Dhabi (ATIC) zit hier achter. Zij zijn 100% eigenaar van GlobalFoundries. Ajit Manocha is de beoogde CEO van licentiehuis POET Technologies. Hij mocht zijn opvolger bij GF zelf kiezen en is in januari 'adviseur' geworden bij GF, dat de op 1 na grootste chipfabrikant van de wereld is.

Inmiddels is GF (ATIC) miljarden in productie in de VS aan het investeren. Onder meer de aanschaf van de af te stoten IBM capaciteit.

Dit past bij de redenering dat de technologie dat continent niet zou mogen verlaten in verband met de militaire toepassingen, zie de partner van POET, een klein militair tech bedrijfje met de naam BAE.
33 Posts, Pagina: 1 2 » | Laatste
Aantal posts per pagina:  20 50 100 | Omhoog ↑

Plaats een reactie

Meedoen aan de discussie?

Word nu gratis lid of log in met uw e-mailadres en wachtwoord.

Direct naar Forum

Detail

Vertraagd 3 jul 2020 11:56
Koers 337,450
Verschil +4,700 (+1,41%)
Hoog 338,850
Laag 334,300
Volume 152.825
Volume gemiddeld 1.169.737
Volume gisteren 827.104

Brussel real time stocks quotedata by Euronext. Other real time EU stocks, by Cboe Europe Ltd.; US stocks by NYSE & Cboe BZX Exchange, 15 min. delayed
#/^ Index indications calculated real time, zie disclaimer, streaming powered by: VWD Group